Title:

Impact of the Berkeley Excise Tax on Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption

URL: http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2016.303362
Summary:

In March 2015, Berkeley California became the first US jurisdiction to implement a tax ($0.01/oz) on sugar-sweetened beverages. Consumption of SSBs decreased 21% in Berkeley and increased 4% in comparison cities. Water consumption increased more in Berkeley (+63%) than in comparison cities (+19%; P<0.01).

Highlights:

Objectives. To evaluate the impact of the excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption in Berkeley, California, which became the first US jurisdiction to implement such a tax ($0.01/oz) in March 2015.

Methods. We used a repeated cross-sectional design to examine changes in pre- to posttax beverage consumption in low-income neighborhoods in Berkeley versus in the comparison cities of Oakland and San Francisco, California. A beverage frequency questionnaire was interviewer administered to 990 participants before the tax and 1689 after the tax (approximately 8 months after the vote and 4 months after implementation) to examine relative changes in consumption.

Results. Consumption of SSBs decreased 21% in Berkeley and increased 4% in comparison cities (P=.046). Water consumption increased more in Berkeley (+63%) than in comparison cities (+19%; P<.01).

Conclusions. Berkeley's excise tax reduced SSB consumption in low-income neighborhoods. Evaluating SSB taxes in other cities will improve understanding of their public health benefit and their generalizability.

Topics: Health Promotion, Nutrition
Location: US-California
Resource Type: strategies and interventions
Publisher: American Journal of Public Health
Date Last Updated: 2016-10-29 16:54:18

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