Feedback

What is this Tool?

  • A process for providing participants with information about the impact of their actions.
  • Individual feedback provides information on the impact of an individuals participation.
  • Community feedback provides the results of an entire group\''s efforts.
  • A key element of social learning theory (http://rex.nci.nih.gov/NCI_Pub_Interface/Theory_at_glance/HOME.html)

Why Would You Use It?

  • Because feedback helps individuals learn from their actions and make improvements.
  • Because it enables people to see how they are making a difference, and is therefore an important element of building motivation.
  • Because it helps develop community norms by showing that many others are participating.

When Would You Use It?

  • Individual feedback should be provided whenever a practical method is available for doing so.
  • Group feedback should always be provided. It is usually best to do so once the results being shared are sufficiently inspiring.

How Would You Use It?

 
1. Decide what you would like to provide feedback on..

Examples

Global Action Plan (GAP) participants were provided with information on both individual and group progress toward achieving the program's objectives. These objectives included diversion of waste from landfill, and reductions in the use of electricity, natural gas, water and transportation fuel. GAP also publicized the amount of money that participants saved through their actions, because cost savings was one factor that motivated people totake action.

JEEP provided feedback on progress toward its main goal - achieving a specific reduction in electricity usage.

Your Program

List your programs key measurable objectives (see "Planning Guide)".

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2. Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change

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3. Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change

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Also list the key factors that motivate people to do the activity. Feedback on these factors may be particularly relevant and inspiring to participants and those interested in becoming involved.

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2. Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change

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Check off those you can cost-effectively track on an individual basis and on a group basis.

 
2. Provide individual feedback if practical.

Examples

US study finds that energy reductions from Home Energy Reports are statistically significant within two weeks and relatively stable.

UGA designed and tested a recycling bin that lit up and displayed a count with the number of items that had been placed into the bin.

Opower’s home energy reports included a comparison with other similar households, offered tips and strategies to reduce energy use, and provided seasonal energy consumption information. The reports also offered utilities the opportunity to send text messages directly to their customers to alert them when their energy consumption was high and to offer ways to reduce it.

In Class 5’s school programs, student energy squads were organized to patrol the schools. They recognized good behavior with WOW Post-It notes and left OOPS stickers behind where energy was being wasted. The students particularly loved busting their teachers for leaving things on.

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A JEEP home visit team examines utility bills to determine potential cost savings available to homeowners. Future bills will provide individual feedback.

Your Program

Which items (if any) that you identified in step 1 would be practical to report back to individuals?

How might you provide this feedback?

Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change

 
3. Decide how to provide cost- effective community feedback.

Examples

During Japan’s Super Cool Biz program, its electricity providers announced daily energy use in the morning news and aboard some trains.

To encourage additional energy saving behaviors, the City of Burlington continued to provide monthly statements on energy consumption to all facility staff after its Ice Rink Competition was completed.

Bicycle Friendly Communities used public feedback and recognition to make it as risk-free and more career-enhancing for key decision makers to initiate and support cycle-friendly travel options as to choose the status quo.

Information on the collective accomplishments of all GAP EcoTeams was tabulated and distributed every three months in a newsletter to current and past participants. GAP also made use of newspapers, television, computer networks, and award systems within each community.

Tip: In general, stick to a few items to give community feedback.

Tip: For tips on feedback that people will be more likely to notice, remember and act on, see the Tool Vivid, Personalized Communication.

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JEEPs community feedback sign.

Your Program

List the items for which you can provide community feedback:

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How could you provide it?
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change signs tracking progress
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change media
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change wall calendars
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change literature/newsletters
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change special events
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change presentations