STEP 5: Choosing Tools of Change

In this section you will identify Tools of Change that might assist your program in achieving its objectives.

You will:

  • Consider how to motivate people to make the desired changes.
  • Choose ways to help them remember to do the new actions.
  • Find ways of making it easier for people to take each next step.
  • Decide how you will build motivation and social momentum over time.
  • Create an effective marketing mix by carefully choosing appropriate combinations and sequences of the tools.

For a definition of each tool and tips on when to use it, see the Tools of Change referred to below.
Note for Health Promoters

1. Decide how you will motivate people to start doing the activity.

Examples

Team Power Smart accepted that for most people energy efficiency is low-involvement, so it connected specific energy-efficiency behaviors with topics people were already passionate about, including health and wellness, food and drink, life and leisure, family and relationships, home and garden, and gadgets and technology.

Love to Ride used tailored prompts, rewards, incentives, peer group pressure, prizes and pledges to attract and retain people in the program.

COAST found that small guaranteed gifts (such as branded underwear) were effective in encouraging young people to get tested for STIs.

BRIDGE first built up feelings of self-efficacy. Otherwise, it ran the risk that many people might have simply ignored the program messages rather than taking action, and might have become further stigmatized and marginalized.

Your Program

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Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change Use incentives -- see the Tool Financial Incentives and Disincentives)
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change Appeal to norms -- see the Tool Norm Appeals
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change Use vivid, personalized messages -- see the Tool Vivid, Personalized Communication
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change Involve individuals personally -- see the Tool Building Motivation Over Time
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change Involve school children as change agents -- see the Tool School Programs that Involve the Family
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change Approach people through their work places -- see the Tool Work Programs that Influence the Home
 
2. Choose ways to help people remember to do the action.

Examples

Drama Downunder offered an online reminder system that prompted participants to get tested regularly.

COAST gave free branded underwear to young people who were screened, as a reminder of the importance of using condoms and regular screening.

The Get in the Loop - Buy Recycled campaign used "shelf talkers" to identify specific recycled-product choices on the store shelf. A "shelf talker" is a simple marker placed on the edge of a standard retail shelf, below the product.

Many waste reduction programs have successfully promoted recycling by making it easy to put recyclables at the curb for collection at the same time as garbage. In addition, Quinte Regional Recycling linked composting with recycling by putting decals on people's Blue Boxes that said, "We compost too."

Your Program

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Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change Provide reminders (decals, tags, etc.) in places where the action, or the decision to take action, occurs -- see the Tool Prompts
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change Make a link to activities people are already doing -- see the Tool Building Motivation Over Time
 
3. Find ways to make it easier for people in your target groups to take each next step.

Examples

Burlington’s Ice Rink Energy Competition held central energy management training workshops as well as a training "road show" at multiple city facilities to train arena staff.

A few days before each appointment, North Shore Recycling’s Compost Coaching program phoned the resident to remind her of her appointment and ask a few questions. At this point, if picking up the bin from the depot had been a barrier to composting, the Coach would deliver the free bin directly to the resident’s home.

Love to Ride segmented its audience into six groups, by stage of change. The barriers tended to be different at each stage and this drove a different intervention for each group.

BIXI made it convenient for even the most casual user to choose cycling as a transportation option. It offered many docking stations throughout the city centre, with excellent connections with major bus and subway train stops, and bikes could be taken and returned from and to any of the docking stations.

Your Program

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Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change Address the key situation-specific barriers identified in "Getting Informed" -- see the Tool Overcoming Specific Barriers
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change Provide, at each step, attractive opportunities to take further steps -- see the Tool Building Motivation Over Time

 

 

 

 
4. Decide how you will build motivation for continuing the action, and sustain momentum over time.

Examples

Opower’s home energy reports included a comparison with other similar households, offered tips and strategies to reduce energy use, and provided seasonal energy consumption information. It also offered utilities the opportunity to send text messages directly to their customers to alert them when their energy consumption was high and to offer ways to reduce it.

In Class 5?s school programs, student energy squads were organized to patrol the schools. They recognized good behavior with WOW Post-It notes and left OOPS stickers behind where energy was being wasted. The students particularly loved busting their teachers for leaving things on.

COAST's upstream changes were maintained, thereby increasing testing rates remarkably over the long term.

Follow-up meetings provided ongoing support for clients at the Montreal Dietary Dispensary. Every time a client visited the center, she received a ticket for a monthly prize draw. Women also had access to knitted baby wear and hair styling donated by volunteers. These approaches helped keep dropout rates as low as 5%.

Your Program

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Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change Make a link to actions that people in your target groups are already doing
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change Recognize and reinforce their current motivation regarding related actions and issues, and
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change Involve them personally in further steps -- see the Tool Building Motivation Over Time.
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change Obtain an oral or written commitment to take the desired action -- see the Tool Obtaining a Commitment
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change Increase the visibility of participation -- see the Tool Norm Appeals
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change Enhance word-of-mouth communication of your participants involvement, enthusiasm, and benefits gained -- see the Tool Word-of-mouth
Login to Save Plans for Tools of Change Provide recognition and feedback -- see the Tool Feedback
 
5. Select the communication channels and vehicles you will use to reach your audience